Alternating text and code

Sphinx-Gallery is capable of transforming Python files into rST files with a notebook structure. For this to be used you need to respect some syntax rules. This example demonstrates how to alternate text and code blocks and some edge cases. It was designed to be compared with the source Python script.

This is the first text block and directly follows the header docstring above.

import numpy as np
# You can separate code blocks using either a single line of ``#``'s
# (>=20 columns), ``#%%``, or ``# %%``. For consistency, it is recommend that
# you use only one of the above three 'block splitter' options in your project.
A = 1

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Block splitters allow you alternate between code and text blocks and separate sequential blocks of code (above) and text (below).

A line of #’s also works for separating blocks. The above line of #’s separates the text block above from this text block. Notice however, that separated text blocks only shows as a new lines between text, in the rendered output.

def dummy():
    """This should not be part of a 'text' block'"""

    # %%
    # This comment inside a code block will remain in the code block
    pass

# this line should not be part of a 'text' block

The above syntax makes a line cut in Sphinx. Note the space between the first # and the line of #’s.

Warning

The next kind of comments are not supported (notice the line of #’s and the # %% start at the margin instead of being indented like above) and become too hard to escape so just don’t use code like this:

def dummy2():
    """Function docstring"""
####################################
# This comment
# %%
# and this comment inside python indentation
# breaks the block structure and is not
# supported
    dummy2
"""Free strings are not supported. They will be rendered as a code block"""

Out:

'Free strings are not supported. They will be rendered as a code block'

New lines can be included in your text block and the parser is capable of retaining this important whitespace to work with Sphinx. Everything after a block splitter and starting with # then one space, is interpreted by Sphinx-Gallery to be a rST text block. Keep your text block together using # and a space at the beginning of each line.

rST header within text block

print('one')

Out:

one
# another way to separate code blocks shown above
B = 1

Last text block.

That’s all folks !

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
"""
Alternating text and code
=========================

Sphinx-Gallery is capable of transforming Python files into rST files
with a notebook structure. For this to be used you need to respect some syntax
rules. This example demonstrates how to alternate text and code blocks and some
edge cases. It was designed to be compared with the
:download:`source Python script <plot_parse.py>`."""


# %%
# This is the first text block and directly follows the header docstring above.

import numpy as np

# %%

# You can separate code blocks using either a single line of ``#``'s
# (>=20 columns), ``#%%``, or ``# %%``. For consistency, it is recommend that
# you use only one of the above three 'block splitter' options in your project.
A = 1

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# %%
# Block splitters allow you alternate between code and text blocks **and**
# separate sequential blocks of code (above) and text (below).

##############################################################################
# A line of ``#``'s also works for separating blocks. The above line of ``#``'s
# separates the text block above from this text block. Notice however, that
# separated text blocks only shows as a new lines between text, in the rendered
# output.

def dummy():
    """This should not be part of a 'text' block'"""

    # %%
    # This comment inside a code block will remain in the code block
    pass

# this line should not be part of a 'text' block

# %%
#
# ####################################################################
#
# The above syntax makes a line cut in Sphinx. Note the space between the first
# ``#`` and the line of ``#``'s.

# %%
# .. warning::
#     The next kind of comments are not supported (notice the line of ``#``'s
#     and the ``# %%`` start at the margin instead of being indented like
#     above) and become too hard to escape so just don't use code like this::
#
#         def dummy2():
#             """Function docstring"""
#         ####################################
#         # This comment
#         # %%
#         # and this comment inside python indentation
#         # breaks the block structure and is not
#         # supported
#             dummy2
#

"""Free strings are not supported. They will be rendered as a code block"""

# %%
# New lines can be included in your text block and the parser
# is capable of retaining this important whitespace to work with Sphinx.
# Everything after a block splitter and starting with ``#`` then one space,
# is interpreted by Sphinx-Gallery to be a rST text block. Keep your text
# block together using ``#`` and a space at the beginning of each line.
#
# rST header within text block
# ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

print('one')

# %%
#

# another way to separate code blocks shown above
B = 1

# %%
# Last text block.
#
# That's all folks !
#
# .. literalinclude:: plot_parse.py
#
#

Total running time of the script: ( 0 minutes 1.108 seconds)

Estimated memory usage: 8 MB

Gallery generated by Sphinx-Gallery